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Artists break the Silence of Acadians as CTV News Atlantic.ca Faces Accusations of Francophobic Exclusion

Francophobic exclusion of Acadians at CTV News Atlantic.ca programming

Contemporary artists shatter the Silence of Acadian’s representation in CTV News Atlantic.ca mission statement omission as Bell Media Faces Accusations of Francophobic Exclusion of the founding ethnic-culture.

Francophobic exclusion at Halifax centric Bell media news programming
Francophobic exclusion at Halifax-centric Bell Media News programming

The rural communities of Acadians, deeply rooted in Atlantic Canada since 1604, have recently found their voice against the CRTC an d  CTV News Atlantic.ca, accusing the news outlet of francophobic exclusion. Despite Acadians’ rich history and significant presence in the region, their representation on the news platform must be more present since it is nonexistent as of this writing. This article explores the discontent within the Acadian community, highlighting the stark contrast between the historical presence of Acadians and their virtual invisibility on CTV News Atlantic.ca. The weekly two hours of prime time is devoted to mundane issues like the weather three times in the two hours on air. There is time for kitten and puppy videos, but no Acadians from down the Hill-bill Claregyle shore.

The Trust Project and the Blatant Discrepancies:

Francophobic exclusion at Halifax centric Bell media news programming
Francophobic exclusion at Halifax-centric Bell Media News programming

Underlining the issue is the contradiction between CTV News Atlantic.ca’s association with The Trust Project and its failure to uphold the principles of full inclusion yet not do so. The Trust Project, an initiative committed to promoting transparency, accuracy, and fairness in journalism, is proudly endorsed by Bell Media, the parent company of CTV News, which has no plans to decrease this ideology anytime soon. However, the Acadian community argues that this commitment to inclusivity is not reflected in the media representation of their full spectrum ethnic group, like the Acadians of the region and their contributions to the Contemporary Arts and Music.

Trust Project and its failure to uphold the principles of full inclusion of French Acadian culture in the southwest,”  Nova Scotia. The Trust Project, an initiative committed to promoting transparency, accuracy, and fairness in journalism, is proudly endorsed by Bell Media, the parent company of CTV News, which has no plans to decrease this ideology anytime soon. However, the Acadian community argues that this commitment to inclusivity is not reflected in the media representation of their full spectrum ethnic group, like the Acadians of the region and their contributions to the Contemporary Arts and Music.

Contemporary Artists Speak Out for inclusion:

French Acadians continue to demand inclusion with CTV Atlantic News.ca program agenda.
French Acadians continue to demand inclusion in the   CTV Atlantic News.ca program agenda.

In an era where diversity and inclusion are at the forefront of media discussions, contemporary artists within the Acadian community have drawn attention to the issue. They express their frustration by likening the exclusion of Acadians to the historical struggles faced by other marginalized communities. One artist provocatively states, “Acadian is the new Black Mi’kmaq,” pointing out the irony that while CTV News Atlantic.ca features regular representations of Black Mi’kmaq individuals and women, the French Acadian community remains conspicuously absent from the narrative.

The Erasure of Acadians: A Nightly Routine:

A particular grievance voiced by the Acadian community is the routine exclusion they experience during the nightly news program. Despite the diverse ethno-cultural fabric of Nova Scotia, CTV News Atlantic.ca consistently needs to include the Acadian perspective. The absence of Acadian voices in these crucial news segments not only perpetuates a skewed representation of the region but also contributes to the erasure of the Acadian identity, which has played a vital role in shaping Atlantic Canada since the early 17th century.

Claregye CommunityTakes it to Social Media:

Frustrated by the ongoing exclusion, the Acadian community in Claregyle has decided to take matters into their own hands by leveraging the power of social media. Recognizing the influence and reach of online platforms, community members have initiated a campaign to shed light on the lack of Acadian representation in CTV News Atlantic.ca. They aim to create awareness and garner support for their cause through hashtags, online petitions, and compelling narratives.

Continue efforts to stop the slide into assimilation from lack of media representation.

The French Acadian community in Atlantic Canada is no longer willing to accept the status quo of being silenced by mainstream media with a CRTC licensing body asleep at the wheel of neglect and oversights, as it looks the other way.     The accusations against CTV News Atlantic.ca for its francophobic exclusion have highlighted a glaring discrepancy between the network’s professed commitment to inclusivity and the lived experience of the Acadian community. As Claregyle and other Acadian communities take their concerns to social media, they hope to bring about a shift in Bell Media’s ethnocultural tartan fabric media representation in Nova Scotia. The call for change is not just about the Acadian community but a broader plea for a more accurate and inclusive reflection of the diverse tapestry that makes up Atlantic Canada.

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